Tuesday’s letters: Albertans will pay cost of provincial police

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I know this police project is just a $600-million dollar vanity project of a premier determined to blow up Alberta, but my first reaction to his municipalities speech was, back the truck up. It is not, there, there, I will pay the cost. It is we who will pay this largess. Last time I looked, there’s only one pocket. And in typical UCP fashion, the municipalities are talked down to like Uncle Buzz. It distinctly was made to sound like it wouldn’t cost you a dime. I, Pappa Bear Jason, will look after it so you forget the $600-million argument.
Sweep any costs issue under the table. Next question?

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Where’s Travis Toews’ favourite cliche that we have to spend services money like those other provinces?

D.A. Taylor, Edmonton

Democracy, universities under UCP attack

Two opinion writers in the Edmonton Journal of Thursday, Nov. 25, hit their nails right on their heads. Gil McGowan eloquently and accurately points out how the UCP government’s Elections Statutes Amendment Act is an open attack on democracy itself. These anti-democratic attacks seem to have become brand trademarks of right-of-centre political parties around the world making a mockery of the sacrifices of two world wars and countless conflicts against the forces of tyranny since.

The other writer, the inestimable Michael Phair, so rightly points out how the latest government proposals for post-secondary educational institutions would make them mere tools of a corporatocracy to produce, without regulatory hindrance, custom-designed and built employees. The whole concept demonstrates the smallness of the minds of the MLAs making up the current governing party and taking up scarce space and valuable resources in the provincial legislature.

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These proposals prove once again the inability of right-wing ideologues to think beyond the confines of their tiny little world of counting pennies. The concept that the purpose of post-secondary educational institutions is to teach and inquire about how the wider world, and indeed, the universe works, is totally beyond the comprehension of the current government and, considerable evidence suggests, the UCP as a whole.

Robert McDonald, St. Albert

Boycott sponsors to protest China Olympics

Re. “We can all boycott ‘Genocide Olympics,’ Opinion, Nov. 25

I agree with Ms. McCuaig-Johnston in advocating a consumer boycott of the 2022 Winter Olympics.

As the IOC and our Canadian government appear to be loathe to call out the Chinese Communist Party for its treatment of the Uyghurs and many of those in Hong Kong, individual Canadians can take a stand.

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“Boycott the Olympic Sponsors” can send a message to organizations like the CBC which is paying to broadcast these games and those who chose to sponsor the games, and legitimize certain actions by the host country. This is a way fair-minded individuals in Canada can make a difference,

R.M. Kruhlak, Edmonton

Rescind Suzuki’s honorary U of A degree

Regarding the recent David Suzuki controversy regarding his tacit support for violence against Alberta, I feel that it is in order for the senate of the University of Alberta to consider a motion to rescind the honorary degree that they in recent times conferred on David Suzuki.

Notwithstanding his apology, the damage has already been done. For decades, Mr. Suzuki has openly opposed the Alberta petroleum industry, the industrial lifeblood of this wonderful and generous province. If it is possible to take down statues of John A. Macdonald and others it must surely be possible for the U of A to do this. I would suspect that the provincial government would be supportive of such a move in future U of A funding requests. Something tangible needs to be done in response to the outrageous act.

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Bob Gaetz, Edmonton

Unfair to suspend detective’s pay

In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the Queen of Hearts impatiently declares during the trial of the Knave of Hearts, “Sentence first —verdict afterwards.”

Something very similar, but by no means as amusing, is occurring within the Edmonton Police Service after reading the story of the service suddenly deciding to cease paying a suspended detective who went public with corruption allegations against his superiors.

Although being suspended since January, the detective continued to be paid his salary, and rightly so. Now, after 10 months, the police chief has decided to no longer pay the officer, even though the officer has not been charged with anything, let alone been convicted of anything? The irony here is genuinely ironic only if one assumes that the detective is guilty — and that is precisely what the detective has unequivocally been denying and what remains to be fought out in court.  

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That Chief McFee is allowing this officer’s pay to be suddenly suspended, in the absence of guilt, let alone being charged with an offence, isn’t ironic but is tragic, especially coming from a City of Edmonton employee who is supposed to be afforded some whistleblower protection and especially for an employee of a police force, where one of the fundamentals in dealing with its employees should be to abide by the rule of law.

Randy Kish, St. Albert

Elks apology doesn’t go far enough

I am an old white female. My old white husband and I have held Eskimo/Elks season tickets since 1972. That puts us among the most stalwart fans who have stuck by our team through thick and thin both enthusiastically and financially.

This old couple listened to the board’s news conference and was encouraged by the plans in the works. However, we were shocked to hear the manner in which Ian Murray complained that the fan base is “old.” We are old, but as this organization struggles to reach the younger generations, we are the very fans who have kept the team going. Young Ian’s letter in Friday’s Journal at least adds “deep” gratitude for “long-term fans.”

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However, this does not go far enough in acknowledging the disrespect he showed even as he is asking us to renew our seats for next year.

Donna and Jim Begg, Edmonton

Alberta needs a non-partisan police force

Dear Premier Kenney: The majority of Albertans don’t want a provincial police force and I agree; keep the RCMP.

I don’t want you as premier or your UCP henchmen to be able to influence police. Having watched how you were elected leader of UCP, watched Minister Shandro show up on a critic’s doorstep to verbally attack and confront them, enact legislation to prohibit public protest then having to amend it because many of your supporters are literally attacking our medical workers — frankly, I don’t trust you or your government and neutral policing is essential to our democracy.

We are already experiencing doubts about some municipal forces such as Lethbridge and we don’t need a provincial force compounding this problem.

Code Clements, Cherry Grove

Preserve statue of Klondike Mike

Recently I was at the expo site and noticed that large statue of Klondike Mike was still standing tall on the south side of the parking lot along with the gold panning exhibit and all the other buildings from the former Klondike Days exhibition. It brought back many fond memories of days gone past as it would with many other people.

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I managed to speak with an employee who was on site and asked him about the plans for these past icons. The employee mentioned they were a product of the demise of Edmonton Northlands and would probably be disposed of in the near future, as the grounds and buildings are being decommissioned for future development. My immediate thoughts were to have the complete exhibit moved to Fort Edmonton Park so we may all enjoy and share the memories of the golden years of Klondike Days and our personal experience with our grandchildren and others.

Come on Edmonton, let’s do this as we can all feel a little happier in these different times

Nick Smit, Edmonton​

Letters welcome

We invite you to write letters to the editor. A maximum of 150 words is preferred. Letters must carry a first and last name, or two initials and a last name, and include an address and daytime telephone number. All letters are subject to editing. We don’t publish letters addressed to others or sent to other publications. Email: letters@edmontonjournal.com

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