Saturday’s letters: Schools need better COVID resources

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Minister LaGrange is not indicating actions to provide a safe learning place. Previous outbreaks and modelling for Omicron call for effective preventative actions. Masks and tests are a last-ditch defence for staff and students. Actions on engineering controls are needed, including updated ventilation, and simple, effective portable air purifiers with HEPA filters to reduce virus concentrations.

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Many advocated this since fall and these points are included in department COVID documents. It seems the government has no planning or action on these protective measures. Also, vaccinations are crucial and need to be clearly promoted and organized for staff and students. Instead, with a nod to the unvaccinated, a mild suggestion that people “take precautions that make sense to them.”

This is not leadership and does not address this serious situation. We expect better tools and resources for those
considered essential workers, and the children who attend. They are working hard to be safe and keep operating. Deliver the resources they need to do this.

Brent Dane, Edmonton

GST on carbon tax is highway robbery

Is it no wonder that people are down and out and ticked, and what a wonderful combination that is. Just got our utility bill which I expected to be high due to extreme cold out west. However, there it was — carbon tax: $30. But the anger starts with the list of charges that were subjected to a GST charge which included the federal carbon tax. Come on!

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This is highway robbery by the government and no political party has stood up and screamed, enough. We have had a hard two years but it looks like the Liberal government has no idea how to operate within its means. This tax and the others are unacceptable.

L.G. Anderson, Spruce Grove

Allowing alcohol in parks will lead to abuse

I am pretty skeptical of this new direction of having alcohol in public parks. It’s because of human nature and how people will become complacent and start taking advantage of these privileges. It may seem like a lovely premise — a nice cool beer or two or a glass of wine or two with friends on a lawn. That’s a lovely sentiment for down-to-earth, reasonable people. However, and this is where the huge “but” comes into play, our society is definitely not made up of all these types of people.

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The past nearly three years of the pandemic has shown how many truly unrealistic and selfish people we have who only think of their well-being and who do not wish to follow regulations and rules. I fear that alcohol in parks is going to lead to huge parties and situations where the authorities will not be able to take control.

We had those issues in a local campground for several years every weekend until they had to clamp down and take away the privileges to campers. It was a blasted nightmare for the residents who lived by the campground. The old adage if you give people an inch they will take a mile certainly comes to mind.

Sharon Flemming, Edmonton

UCP’s back-to-school plan a gamble

The provincial government has promised rapid tests and medical masks for students’ return to school. But the reality is that they won’t show up for a week, and the masks are inadequate, and this is for the least-vaccinated portion of the population. Another gamble for vulnerable people’s health.

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How many children will bring COVID to school and pass it along to other students and then the community? How can Dr. Hinshaw support this misguided UCP strategy?

Stephen Luck, Edmonton

Good deed showcases Edmonton’s nature

Happy New Year to the wonderful young couple that kindly drove us home after we were stranded at Southgate shopping centre. They represent the compassionate and generous nature of the citizens of Edmonton. Thank you again.

Rene Bladon, Edmonton

Letters welcome

We invite you to write letters to the editor. A maximum of 150 words is preferred. Letters must carry a first and last name, or two initials and a last name, and include an address and daytime telephone number. All letters are subject to editing. We don’t publish letters addressed to others or sent to other publications. Email: letters@edmontonjournal.com

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